Pillows of Happiness

That’s what I decided to call them anyway, Pumpkin Ravioli with sage butter. My husband’s parents have been taking care of some family matters and as a result missed Thanksgiving with us (I know it was really hard to resist the garage turkey). They arrived back so I decided to do a special Sunday dinner and try to make something that I had not attempted before. As you know from my posts it is fairly recent that I have attempted and tackled homemade pasta. For several years I have been considering a recipe that I found at Williams-Sonoma, that also just happens to be in the pasta cookbook I received last Christmas: Pumpkin Ravioli. 

In additition to being inspired by the recipe, I have had a ravioli form since we got married that I had not used. As intimidated as I was by pasta, I was equally intimidated by a filled pasta. 

To go with the ravioli I decided on chicken apple sausage and roasted Brussels sprouts. It was a busy day with an early morning game and lots of shoveling so I was thankful to my boys who both helped in the kitchen. While my elder son shredded a chicken for the following night’s dinner my younger son cleaned the sprouts and I got to make the pasta dough.


The pasta recipe is from the same cookbook as the ravioli, and for efficiency I use the food processor. 

Flour and salt:

Add the oil to the eggs and then pour them into the bowl of the processor.

  

And then mix, using the pulse function, adding flour as needed until it holds together but isn’t sticky.


Once it comes together, knead it for 10 minutes on your bread board until you have a smooth dough. Then let it rest.


If you have gotten out all of your ingredients ahead of time, there is enough time to put together the filling while the dough rests. Alternatively, you could make ahead of time and keep it chilled. 

 While the recipe calls for 1 small pumpkin (~1 lb.), I opted to use my frozen pumpkin (canned would be fine too). 

I had a single container with 2 cups of pumpkin that I mixed with the egg yolk. (I had leftover pasta that I would have preferred to use so please look at my notes on how to adjust accordingly.)

  

And then I mixed in the rest. 

  

 Always better to grind whole nutmeg!

  

By that time my dough was ready to start rolling. I sat the layers aside between sheets of floured parchment under a damp towel until the dough was all rolled out.


To fill the pasta, I began by flouring the form. 


Then 1 sheet goes on the bottom piece (with the holes) and then you press gently with the top piece to make the pockets for filling. Then fill each spot with about 1 teaspoon of filling. To make sure each ravioli seals well, brush the edges of each with a pastry brush and cool water.

  



Lay a second sheet over the top, gently lifting the edges and pressing to ensure no air bubbles are trapped. The use the small rolling pin to seal them firmly and cut the edges.

  



Firmly tap them out onto a floured parchment lined baking sheet(s). Refrigerate until you are ready to cook them or freeze them. 



I clarified my butter and started roasting the Brussel sprouts before starting my water.

      


    

I also started browning some chicken-apple sausages that I sprinkled with a dash of cinnamon.


When the sprouts and sausages were done, I made the sage butter and boiled the pasta.



  

  

Dinner is served! With a wonderful salad from my MIL.





Egg Pasta for Baked and Stuffed Pastas

Entrées, Not Shared, Pastas, Tested and Approved!
Source Williams-Sonoma | The Pasta Book, by Julia della Croce (Weldon Owen, 2010)

Paprika Recipe File

INGREDIENTS

  • 3 cups unbleached all-purpose or “00” flour (see notes), plus more as needed
  • ½ tsp., scant, fine sea salt
  • 5 eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil

DIRECTIONS

To make the dough by hand, measure the flour onto a work surface, mix in the salt and shape the flour into a mound. Using your fingertips, make a well in the center. Break the eggs into the center of the well and add the olive oil. Using a fork, beat until the eggs and oil are blended, making sure the liquid does not breach the walls of the well.

Using the fork, gradually draw the flour from the sides of the well into the egg mixture and beat gently, always in the same direction, to combine the flour with the liquid. Secure the wall of the well with your other hand until the liquid has absorbed enough flour that it will not flow over the wall.

When the mixture is too stiff to use the fork, begin using both hands, gradually drawing in the flour from the bottom of the wall, until you have a soft, moist, but not sticky ball of dough. If the dough will not absorb more flour without becoming stiff, do not use it all. If it is too soft, add more flour, a spoonful at a time. Clean the work surface, dust it lightly with flour and flatten the ball of dough into a disk.

To make the dough with a food processor, fit a food processor with the metal blade. Add all but 1/2 cup of the flour and the salt to the work bowl and pulse to mix. You will use the reserved 1/2 cup flour later to adjust the consistency of the dough.

Crack the eggs into a liquid measuring cup and remove any stray shells. Add the olive oil; there is no need to stir. Pour the eggs and oil into the work bowl. Process until the flour is evenly moistened and crumbly, about 10 seconds. Test the dough by pinching it; if it is very sticky, add more flour, 1 Tbs. at a time, processing until it is incorporated. After about 30 seconds total, the dough should come together in a loose ball and feel moist but not sticky.

Dust a clean work surface with flour. Remove the ball of dough from the food processor and place it in the center of the floured surface. Using your hands, flatten the dough into a disk.

For both methods: Using the heel of your hand, push the dough down and away from you, fold it in half back toward you, rotate a quarter turn and repeat the kneading motion. After about 10 minutes, the dough should be smooth and elastic.

Shape the dough into a ball, cover with an overturned bowl and let rest for 15 minutes before you roll it out. The gluten in the flour will relax, making the dough easier to roll. Do not let it rest longer or it will be too dry. Makes 1¼ lb. dough.

Pumpkin Ravioli with Sage Butter

Entrées, Not Shared, Pastas, Tested and Approved!
Makes 6 ∙ Source Williams-Sonoma The Pasta Book, by Julia della Croce (Weldon Owen, 2010)

Paprika Recipe File

INGREDIENTS

For the filling:

  • 2 cups cooked pumpkin (from a ~1 lb. Cheese or Sugar Pie pumpkin, calabaza or butternut squash, seeds and strings removed)
  • 1 egg yolk, lightly beaten
  • 2 Tbs. grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or grana padano cheese
  • 1 Tbs. ricotta
  • ¼ tsp. freshly grated nutmeg
  • ¼ tsp. fine sea salt
  • 1 to 2 Tbs. dried bread crumbs
  • 1¼ lb. egg pasta
  • 5 Tbs. unsalted butter, clarified (see tip below)
  • 12 large fresh sage leaves
  • 2 Tbs. kosher salt
  • Grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese for serving

DIRECTIONS

Transfer the pumpkin puree to a bowl. Add the egg yolk, cheeses, nutmeg and sea salt. Mix well, adding the bread crumbs as needed to bind the ingredients into a cohesive mixture. Cover the filling and set aside.
Using a pasta machine or a floured rolling pin, roll out the pasta dough 1/32 inch thick, then fill and cut the ravioli.

Pour the clarified butter into a small fry pan and place over low heat. Add the sage leaves and heat until the butter is saturated with the flavor of the sage, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and cover to keep warm.

In a large pot over high heat, bring 5 quarts water to a rapid boil. Add the kosher salt, gently drop in half of the ravioli and cover the pot. When the water returns to a boil, uncover and cook, stirring gently occasionally and reducing the heat as needed to prevent the ravioli from knocking against one another and breaking. The total cooking time should be 3 to 5 minutes. To test for doneness, transfer a single raviolo to a cutting board and cut off a corner with a paring knife; if the pasta looks cooked through and the corner tastes tender, the pasta is done. Using a large slotted spoon, lift out the ravioli, allowing a little of the water to cling to them so they remain moist, and transfer to a warmed large, shallow serving bowl; cover the bowl to keep the ravioli warm. Repeat to cook the remaining ravioli.

Drizzle the sage butter over the ravioli and serve immediately. Pass the cheese at the table. Serves 6.

NOTES

Serves 6 with no leftovers (~8-9 ravioli per person); I recommend a double batch of pasta and a triple batch of the pumpkin filling when making pumpkin ravioli so there are leftovers or ravioli to freeze. 

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