Prosciutto Pasta Rolls

One of the reasons I like to watch food TV is for inspiration. About a month ago my husband and I were watching an Italian themed Diners, Drive-ins, and Dives; one of the items they showed was a prosciutto pasta roll. I have tried to find that show to link it to no avail. The recipe looked good but slightly bland. It was simmered cream on the bottom of a baking dish and then lasagna noodles rolled up with sliced prosciutto and fontina. And then cream poured over the top, sprinkled with Parmesan and baked. You can tell from my description that something was missing. 

I scribbled some notes immediately and finally got around to trying it. 

Rather than just cream, I melted butter with 2 cloves of minced garlic until it was very fragrant. Then I added the cream and brought it to a simmer.

When I made my original notes I wrote that it would need either nutmeg or crushed red pepper; smelling the bubbling cream, I quickly decided on freshly ground nutmeg along with a bit of tomato paste. 

After a few more minutes of simmering I put a little in the bottom of the baking dish and set aside the rest.

I had set out a couple of square dishes to soak the pasta sheets. Once they were soft I layered each with Boar’s Head prosciutto piccolo (a more cost effective option since I used a pound), shredded fontina (I started with sliced based on the show and quickly decided that shredded was better), and sliced basil.

Then I rolled them up and cut them into ~1½” chunks and placed them in the baking dish.

When the pan was full, I poured the remainder of the sauce over the top and generously sprinkled the entire dish with Parmesan. 

I baked it at 400F on convection bake for 20 minutes. Although I was worried that it would be dry, the result was perfect and delicious. 

Baked Prosciutto Roll-ups

Paprika Recipe File

Entrées, Pastas, Tested and Approved!

Source Shannon Stacey (inspired by Triple D)


  • 1 pound fresh egg pasta dough, or lasagna sheets, softened
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 clove garlic, minced
  • 1½ cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • ⅛ teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • salt & pepper
  • 1 pound prosciutto, sliced very thin
  • 1 pound fontina, shredded
  • ¼-½ cup basil leaves, sliced
  • Parmesan cheese, grated, for topping


Melt butter in a small saucepan over medium heat, add the garlic and sauté until fragrant. Add the cream and bring the mixture to a simmer and reduce the sauce a bit, about 2-3 minutes. Add the tomato paste and the nutmeg; stir to incorporate. Continue cooking the sauce until it is the consistency of buttermilk, about 2 minutes. Spread a small amount in each baking dish. Set the remainder of the sauce aside.

To form the pasta roses:

On each pasta sheet, layer prosciutto, fontina, and basil, then roll the sheet up like a jelly roll and cut into sections, ~1½-2″ wide. Set in a single or individual baking dishes.

Preheat the oven to 450°F. Pour the remaining sauce over the pasta. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Bake for about 15 minutes, or until a light brown crust forms on top. Remove from the oven; let rest for 5 minutes before serving.


Not Enough Leftovers

We had 10 boys for dinner on Sunday, I had about 5½ lbs. of flat iron steak that I marinated for fajitas. I also sautéed 3 large sweet onions, 3 bell peppers, and 3 poblano peppers. I was planning on using the leftovers to make steak wraps for dinner today. Only 1 problem with the plan, after dinner the meat was gone. No one was hungry, but my Tuesday plans were shot. 

I still had peppers and onions, along with my baked black beans and tomatillo guacamole. So when I finally got to think about what to do for dinner when I got in my car today, I really wanted to figure out how to use it. I thought, I’ll just do soft tacos, it’s easy. When I called my husband, he suggested I look for chorizo and my plan took form. 

I picked up chorizo and thin center cut pork chops, and I set to work dicing the chops. There isn’t much fat on these, but I removed it anyway. 


First I browned the chorizo, and it released beautiful, flavorful oil into my pan. 

I set aside the chorizo, and lightly sautéed the pork in the same pan with a bit of cumin, oregano, and chipotle chili pepper sprinkled on it. 



When it was done I set that with the chorizo until everyone was ready to eat. Tuesdays my older son is working and my younger son is training for lacrosse, so only my husband and I eat together. On a good note this meant I had the time to reheat in my skillet rather than the microwave (ok for lunches, but I prefer not to use). 

My boys ate individually and for each of them I prepped all in the skillet and used the stove to heat the tortillas. 


It was similar for my husband and me; we used both the corn and flour tortillas. 

Delicious, and no wasted food. 

Bacon Makes EVERYTHING Better

Sadly, I still don’t think my sister will try this recipe. 

The main ingredient is One of my faves, butternut squash. It falls in her least favorite foods, orange vegetables. 

A few years ago, I saved a Bon Appétit recipe for a butternut squash pasta. I hadn’t tried it because it called for half of a butternut squash (seriously…what do you do with the other half). 

When we went to pick up our Christmas tree from our corner farm market they were giving away a new butternut squash variety they had planted; it harvested late so they had extras for free. I grabbed a couple and kept them in the garage, each a perfect half squash. 

I started with the squash, peeling and then shredding with my food processor. 


And then I diced my pancetta. 


And sliced the sage.

That is all of the prep work before starting the water for the pasta. 

This includes a few modifications to the original recipe: pancetta (as mentioned, bacon makes EVERYTHING better), the length for browning the butternut squash, and freshly ground pepper (which I should have added to the squash during cooking instead of just at the end). 

While the water took its time coming to a boil, I cooked my pancetta. 


Once it was crispy I set it aside to drain on paper towels and added butter to the pan. I also used this opportunity to add the pasta to my now boiling water.



I cooked the squash and sage similar to how I cook hash browns, stirring occasionally and allowing the bottom to brown between stirring. 


When the pasta was done I added it to the squash with pasta water (ultimately about 1½ cups), the pancetta, and Parmesan.



Meanwhile, my husband washed some lettuce for a salad and used a loaf of roasted garlic bread to make a nice accompaniment.

And while eating was really the best part, I was very excited to use the new pasta dishes that I received from my MIL for Christmas. 

Ultimately an easy weekday meal. 
Pasta with Butternut Squash

Paprika Recipe File

Entrées, Pastas, Pork, Tested and Approved!

Makes 6 servings ∙ Source Bon Appétit | February 2013


  • ½ lb. pancetta, diced
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • ~5 cups shredded butternut squash (from about 1½-2 lbs. peeled squash; shredded with the coarse grating attachment on a food processor or on a box grater)
  • ¼ cup thinly sliced fresh sage
  • pepper, freshly ground
  • 1 pound fiorentini, campanelle, or other short curled pasta
  • ½ cup finely grated Parmesan or Grana Padano plus more


Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil.

While it comes to a boild, cook pancetta in large skillet over medium-high heat. When crispy, set aside with a slotted spoon in a dish lined with paper towels.

When the water comes to a boil, add the pasta and cook as directed for al dente.
Melt the butter in the oil and increse the heat to high. Add squash and sage, season with pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until squash begins to brown, about 8-10 minutes, then reduce heat to medium.

Drain pasta, reserving 2 cups pasta cooking liquid.

Add pasta and ½ cup pasta cooking liquid to squash and stir to coat. Cook over medium heat, stirring, adding more cooking liquid as needed, until sauce coats pasta. Stir in ½ cup Parmesan.

Divide pasta among bowls; top with more Parmesan.


Cheesy Artichoke Tarts

Happy New Year!

We are so close to starting off a new year which for us, will include a lot of changes. We are headed off to a dressy party with good friends and I’ll be taking over an appetizer as I did last year. This year I selected a recipe that I have made before, one I found years ago on a box of Land O’Lakes butter.

It’s VERY easy, and good as written, even though, as you will see in the pictures, today I substituted roasted red peppers and marinated artichoke hearts.

As always, I got out my ingredients:

And then I prepped my pans. It says to use a non-stick spray (which is fine), but I’m not a fan of propellants in my food, so I use a light olive oil in a Pampered Chef spray bottle for this task.

Then the cheeses, pepper, and mustard go into the mixer, followed by the chopped artichoke hearts and bell peppers.




Just like making chocolate chip cookies, two spoons are the best tools for the job of filling the wonton cups.

I’m baking them just before we head out and topping them with chopped parsley.

Have a great evening and a wonderful start to the new year!

Cheesy Artichoke Tarts

Paprika Recipe File

Cook 18-20 minutes ∙ Makes 32 appetizers ∙ Difficulty Easy ∙ Source Land o’Lakes

  • 36 won ton wrappers, 3½” squares
  • 1 cup sharp cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened
  • ½ tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
  • ¼ cup red bell pepper, chopped
  • 14 ounces artichoke hearts, drained, chopped
  • parsley, fresh, chopped (optional)


Heat oven to 350°F. Spray 36 miniature muffin cups with no-stick cooking spray. Gently press 1 won ton wrapper into each muffin cup, allowing ends to extend above cups. Spray edges of wrappers with no-stick cooking spray. Set aside.

Combine cheese, cream cheese, ground red pepper and mustard in medium bowl; mix well. Stir in bell pepper and artichoke hearts. Spoon about 1 tablespoon cheese mixture into each cup.

Bake for 18 to 20 minutes or until cheese mixture is set and edges of wrappers are lightly browned. Garnish with parsley, if desired. Serve warm.